Raising cash for Kash

Student Government and Sophomore class come together to plan activities to support Kash

Information+for+the+activities+on+March+7th+at+Highland+to+support+Make-A-Wish.

Cortnie Hulse

Information for the activities on March 7th at Highland to support Make-A-Wish.

Cortnie Hulse, Reporter

Briley Anderson
A participant comes into the final leg of the color run as part of a fundraiser for Make A Wish.

The Sophomore class plans activities this week to raise money for Make-A-Wish at Highland. There were two activities going on Saturday, the Color Run, and the Sock Hop dance. “I’m really excited for the Color Run,” stated Cameron Leavitt, a senator for the Sophomore class. “We had to take all the time to put all the color in the bottles, and it was really messy. But I think I’ll be really fun and a good activity to raise money.”

The Color Run money will be used for helping Kash’s wish come true through Make-A-Wish. The Color Run is ten dollars if you bring your own shirt to get color on, and fifteen dollars to do the run with a shirt the school gives you. It starts at 10:00AM on Saturday at the school.

This year Kash is in Kindergarten. “He has leukemia, he’s been fighting leukemia for a year,” Shared Teri Mitton, a teacher at Highland. Mrs. Mitton also shared that Kash is doing well. He still has a long way to go before he can say he is cancer-free. “He won’t be able to say he’s cancer-free until he’s in high school.”

Make-A-Wish will allow Kash and his family to go on vacation to Disney Land. “Make-A-Wish what it does, is really, at the time you’re fighting cancer and you’re struggling for your life, a family vacation seems pretty frugalous,” Mrs. Mitton stated. “But, when you’re doing all that and that’s all you can concentrate on the whole time, it’s kind of interesting how a vacation can give you hope and give you a sense of normal.” Make-A-Wish gives kids a break from what they’re going through at the time. It acts as a short escape from the treatments.

The goal is to raise $15,000, which would fund about three wishes. So far, the school has raised over $5,000.

Cortnie Hulse