Should Santa be Real

As high school students, many of us already know Santa isn't real, but should we continue the make-believe tradition for the younger generation?

Santa+having+fun+skiing+in+Switzerland.
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Should Santa be Real

Santa having fun skiing in Switzerland.

Santa having fun skiing in Switzerland.

By Norbert Aepli, Switzerland

Santa having fun skiing in Switzerland.

By Norbert Aepli, Switzerland

By Norbert Aepli, Switzerland

Santa having fun skiing in Switzerland.

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Every year we celebrate Christmas with parties and gifts, but we all know the presents that appear under the Christmas tree don’t come from Santa. Whether we already knew Santa wasn’t real as children or have grown out of that make-believe stage, we all see how Santa affects children. Watching younger siblings write letters to the North Pole or seeing children in the mall running towards the Santa imposter, they are all eager to get the things they want from an imaginary man in red. So is it right for us to continue this lie about Santa and presents?

Children believe anything that is put in front of them. Do you remember your favorite TV shows as a kid? How some of us had imaginary friends or daydreams of being whatever we wanted? Now that we had grown out of that stage, and faced reality, should we let this charade of Santa and other imaginary characters continue on? Most people are spilt on what to do and many parents have their own thoughts of raising their children the “right way”. However, we can agree that almost every family we’ve met celebrate the holidays believing in these fairytales. Even mine tries to continue the magic as we get closer to Christmas Eve.

Although, many times the magic begins and ends on its own. It’s easy to start the tradition of Santa and to set up gifts while the children sleep. The con can go even further with letters for Santa, putting out cookies and carrots, and even seeing the old man at the mall. Even movies, ads, and multiple songs keep the imagination of children alive.

An article from NPR, aimed at parents, talks about keeping that magic alive for as long as possible and rolling with what your children believe in or when they start to doubt. Waiting for them to stop believing and then telling them the truth is the best option for many families. Some kids may already know the hoax and play along or truly believe in the holiday they celebrate. Nevertheless they would be upset on the news to know that such things never really existed. Although trying to live up the lie is over for future holidays.

The most used tip on keeping the holiday spirit up without imagination and blind trust is to celebrate with a different kind of imagination. Giving surprise gifts and doing the same old traditions, such as Christmas dinner or making “Santa” cookies are great. The child might be upset and angry to know the truth about Santa, but in the end, the surprise about presents keeps the holiday great for everyone. So let’s keep pretending for the Christmas holiday.

https://www.npr.org/2019/04/24/716698873/is-it-ok-to-lie-about-santa-and-the-tooth-fairy