Tackle football harms children’s brains

Raimond+Barela+hustles+down+the+field%2C+running+against+the+Coeur+d%27Alene+Vikings.
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Tackle football harms children’s brains

Raimond Barela hustles down the field, running against the Coeur d'Alene Vikings.

Raimond Barela hustles down the field, running against the Coeur d'Alene Vikings.

June Johnson

Raimond Barela hustles down the field, running against the Coeur d'Alene Vikings.

June Johnson

June Johnson

Raimond Barela hustles down the field, running against the Coeur d'Alene Vikings.

Ethan Dowding, Reporter

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Tackle football is a harsh game to play. There are many things that can go wrong in the game. You can get a concussion or break bones, and yet we let our kids go out and play the dangerous sport. People may argue that it builds character when you get hurt and it helps strengthen your bond with your team.  While it may strengthens your bond, it is too dangerous for younger kids to be playing.

“Protection against concussion and complications of brain injury is especially important for young players. including elementary and middle school, high school and college athletes. whose still-developing brains are more susceptible to the lasting effects of trauma,” said study co-author Frank Conidi, MD, DO, MS, director of the Florida Center for Headache and Sports Neurology and Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology at Florida State University College of Medicine in Port Saint Lucie, Fla. Conidi is also the vice-chair of the American Academy of Neurology’s Sports Neurology Section.

For the study, researchers modified the standard drop test system, approved by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. This tests impacts and helmet safety. The researchers used a crash test dummy head and neck to simulate impact. Sensors were also placed in the dummy’s head to measure linear and rotational responses to repeated 12 mile-per-hour impacts. The scientists conducted 330 tests to measure how well 10 popular football helmet designs protected against traumatic brain injury.  this was said by. https://www.aan.com/PressRoom/Home/PressRelease/1241. AkA American Academy of Neutrality

They found out that the pads did protect the head by 77%, but there is still a chance that it could not protect your child. I would find this terrifying as a parent of a small child and I would wait for them to mature a bit before putting them into such a dangerous sport.