Dust in the wind

People once believed that the ash spreading was just a conspiracy, but the Wall Street Journal says that Disney custodians testify it occurs once a month.

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Dust in the wind

Kara Olsen, a former worker at Disneyland and her daughter Sophie.

Kara Olsen, a former worker at Disneyland and her daughter Sophie.

Kara Olsen

Kara Olsen, a former worker at Disneyland and her daughter Sophie.

Kara Olsen

Kara Olsen

Kara Olsen, a former worker at Disneyland and her daughter Sophie.

Jordan Mayo, Dalton Derie, and Kayt Godfrey

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Kara Olsen
Disneyland is known as the happiest place on earth, but some people like it a lot more than others. Some even want to stay at the magical theme park beyond the grave.

People once believed that the ash spreading was just a conspiracy, but the Wall Street Journal mentions that Disney custodians say this occurs once a month. The Wall Street Journal says that they use the code “HEPA cleanup” to report that cremated ashes need to be vacuumed up, and they’ve tried to keep this occurrence hidden from the public for a while.

The Wall Street Journal mentioned that people that do it sneak in the remains by putting them into pill bottles, plastic bags, and more. The article also described that one of the most popular places to spread them is the Haunted Mansion ride, which has made some people assume that the location is haunted.

We interviewed Olivia Henderson, a junior at Highland High School, on the topic. She mentioned that she had been Disneyland ten times, and her favorite ride is Indiana Jones Adventures.

When asked if she had heard about people spreading their ashes there, she said, “Yes, I plan to do that.”  She also described how if she were to sneak cremated ashes into the park, she would put the ashes into a bag.

We also interviewed Kara Olsen, the mother of the Highland freshman Ascha Olsen, due to the fact that she used to work at Disneyland. She worked there during the summer of 1997 as a character host where she got payed six dollars an hour.

She said that she had never seen anyone do it, but she was aware of the HEPA cleanups. When asked about what she thought about people doing this she said, “I think people shouldn’t spread ashes in places where they don’t have permission to do so.”

The thought of people spreading ashes at a beloved theme park might sound strange and disturbing, but there are plenty more unique ways to deal with the dead. One way that you might not have heard of is called Celestis.

The website Lexikin said that this is when when you can have your ashes put into a pod and be shot out into space. You will then orbit the Earth for two years before returning as a shooting star.

From the same website we learned that some people put the remains of loved ones in fireworks. They simply mix it in with the gunpowder and light it up as you would a normal one.

The website also mentions techniques such as using someone’s ashes to become a diamond, along with the opportunity to be planted with a tree. How do you want to be preserved?